Applying for Probate in North Carolina

Any executor named in a will may, at any time after the death of the testator, apply to the clerk of the superior court to have the will admitted to probate. If no named executor applies to have the will proved within 60 days after the death of the testator, any beneficiary named in the will, or any other person interested in the estate, may apply upon 10 days’ notice thereof to the executor. For good cause shown, the clerk of superior court may shorten the initial 60-day period during which the executor may apply to have the will proved.

The clerks of the superior court in North Carolina are required to notify by mail, all beneficiaries whose addresses are known, designated in wills filed for probate in their respective counties. The expenses associated with such notification are chargeable to the estate.

In the event that a party has the will and will not file it with the clerk of court, every clerk, on application by affidavit setting forth the facts, will, by summons, compel any person in the State, who has possession of the will to present the will for probate. If the person refuses or refuses to inform the court where the will is located, he may be held in contempt of the court or be committed to the jail of the county until the will is accounted for or produced.

On application for probate to the clerk of the superior court, he must ascertain by affidavit of the applicant –

(1)        That such applicant is the executor or devisee named in the will, or is some other person interested in the estate, and how so interested.

(2)        The value and nature of the testator’s property, as near as can be ascertained.

(3)        The names and residences of all parties entitled to the testator’s property, if known, or that the same on diligent inquiry cannot be discovered; which of the parties in interest are minors, and whether with or without guardians, and the names and residences of such guardians, if known.

The affidavit shall be recorded with the will and the certificate of probate thereof, if the same is admitted to probate.  Once the will is admitted to probate, the named executor or person presenting the will for probate may be appointed personal representative of the estate by the clerk and issued letters testamentary, allowing them to act on behalf of the estate.

Evan Lohr is an estate attorney with Lohr and Lohr PLLC in Raleigh. He can be contacted at (919) 348-9211 or at evan@lohrnc.com.

 

 

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